IBM Website Monitoring on Cloud is an IBM Cloud Application Performance Management (APM) add-on that enables you to monitor the availability and performance of internet-facing applications and private applications. Your monitoring capabilities depend on which IBM Cloud APM offering you are running.

  • If you have IBM Website Monitoring with IBM Cloud APM, Advanced (SaaS), you can monitor both internet-facing applications and private applications. Website Monitoring runs scheduled synthetic tests at different points of presence (PoPs) around the world, allowing you to proactively detect and fix performance issues for your internet-facing applications before they impact users. You can also install Synthetic Playback agents in private locations to monitor your applications in secure or private locations, such as behind your company firewall.
  • If you have IBM Cloud APM, Advanced Private V8.1.4 or IBM Performance Management V8.1.3 (on premises), you can install Synthetic Playback agents to monitor your applications from secure or private locations, such as behind your company firewall, with Website Monitoring. You cannot monitor internet-facing applications from the public PoPs.

Note: Since the August 2017 release of IBM Cloud APM (V8.1.4), Website Monitoring is no longer available as an IBM Cloud APM add-on, and has been replaced by the new Availability Monitoring add-on. Synthetic monitoring of private applications is still available with IBM Cloud APM, Private (V8.1.4). For more information on Availability Monitoring, see Managing synthetic tests with IBM Availability Monitoring

This page contains links to blogs and other resources to help you follow best practices when using Website Monitoring. New users of Website Monitoring can begin by learning how to record scripts and arrange scripts into test suites. Improve the functionality of your tests, add complex steps, or troubleshoot any issues, by learning how to edit your scripts and how to use variables. Read our scenarios to see how real world issues were solved using Website Monitoring and other resources. Consult our reference material in “Viewing and understanding your data” to understand how Website Monitoring works and how best to make sense of your data.

The resources below are suitable for users of SaaS and On Premises users of IBM Cloud APM.

Topic areas


Recording scripts

In order to test your web applications with a sequence of simulated user actions, you need to record a synthetic script. You can then upload your synthetic scripts to the Synthetic Script Manager in IBM Performance Management to create and schedule transactions that test the performance and availability of your web apps in response to specific user actions. This section contains resources that outline the best practices for recording scripts and using your scripts to create synthetic transactions with Website Monitoring.

Website Monitoring with IBM Performance Management and Selenium IDE (part 1): Overview watch 7:18 mins

Author: Enrico Vannini

Description: In this introduction to Website Monitoring with IBM Performance Management V. 8.1.3, learn how to:

  1. Install the Selenium IDE plugin
  2. Record a synthetic script using Selenium IDE
  3. Upload your script to the Synthetic Script Manager in the IBM Performance Management console and create a synthetic transaction.
  4. Monitor the results in the Application Performance Dashboard and drill down to view response time and availability data for individual transaction instances.

Selenium Scripting Tutorial

Author: Andrew Chan

Description: Learn how to use Selenium IDE to record synthetic scripts that simulate different business processes on your websites.

Recording Synthetic Scripts

Author: RĂșairĂ­ O’Sullivan

Description: In this IBM Knowledge Center topic, learn how to use Selenium IDE to record a simple synthetic script that simulates end user actions on a website.


Creating a test suite

Organize your synthetic scripts into a test suite of Selenium test cases to better represent different business processes. When you upload a test suite of test cases to the Synthetic Script Manager, you can then monitor the availability and performance of each simulated business process on the Application Performance Dashboard.

Website Monitoring with IBM Performance Management and Selenium IDE (part 2): Using Sub-transactions to better isolate Application Issues 
watch 5:53 mins

Author: Enrico Vannini

Description: In this presentation, learn how to:

  1. Split a recorded script into multiple scripts and to create a test suite in Selenium IDE.
  2. Upload the test suite to the Synthetic Script Manager in the IBM Performance Management console.
  3. Monitor the results in the Application Performance Dashboard and drill down to find the specific issue affecting the availability and performance of your application.

Structuring Synthetic Scripts

Author: RĂșairĂ­ O’Sullivan

Description: In this IBM Knowledge Center topic, learn how to divide a synthetic script into a number of test cases where each test case simulates a different business process. This allows you to monitor the availability and performance of each individual business process in IBM Performance Management, on the Application Performance Dashboard.

Selenium Scripting Tutorial

Author: Andrew Chan

Description: In section 2.2 of this tutorial, learn how to divide a recorded script into in different test cases and save the test cases as a test suite in Selenium IDE.


Editing scripts

Recorded scripts often require manual editing in order to simulate certain events in a business process on a website. The resources in this section contain information on how to add flow control and FOR loops, record pop-ups, insert pauses, and troubleshoot playback issues for your scripts.

Selenium Scripting Tutorial

Authors: Andrew Chan

Description: This tutorial describes how to record scripts with Selenium IDE, and how to edit those scripts to add flow control, create FOR loops, and handle returned values.

Troubleshooting for Recorded Scripts

Authors: Yuan Yuan Wu

Description: This tutorial gives troubleshooting tips on how to handle potential issues with your recorded scripts. Learn useful tips to manually edit your scripts and handle potential issues with your recorded synthetic scripts. Edit your scripts to add pauses, handle pop-ups, and locate onscreen elements in different ways.


Using variables in your synthetic scripts

Variables in synthetic scripts can be used to simulate login processes and other processes that require some form of unique user input. This section contains resources on how to work with resources in your synthetic scripts and in the Synthetic Script Manager.

Hiding Passwords in the Synthetic Script Manager

Author: RĂșairĂ­ O’Sullivan

Description: In this IBM Knowledge Center topic, learn how to make your web applications more secure by preventing others from viewing passwords. Use Selenium IDE to store passwords as variables in your synthetic scripts and then hide the password values in the Synthetic Script Manager.


Scenarios

This section contains resources that describe how Website Monitoring can be used to tackle real-world web monitoring scenarios.

How to Monitor Web Applications that Use One-Time Passwords Sent by SMS

Authors: Enrico Vannini; Rafal Szypulka

Description: In this technical article, learn how to design and implement a website monitoring solution that can replicate user logins using one-time passwords that are sent by SMS. Send SMS content from a smartphone to a computer running the Monitoring Agent for Synthetic Playback for IBM Performance Management V. 8.1.3, and set your script to read that content using Selenium IDE.


Viewing and understanding your data

This section contains reference material for understanding the data provided by IBM Website Monitoring.

Understanding IBM Website Monitoring Response Time Overhead

Authors: Xiao Ming Hu

Description: This article outlines how IBM Website Monitoring collects response time data, describes how response times are calculated, and identifies and explains the source of response time overhead in collected measurements.

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