Does application development sometimes feel as complicated as particle physics?
Subatomic particles make up atomic particles, atomic particles make up atoms, atoms make up elements, elements make up molecules, molecules make up materials, and from materials you make things like costumes for Halloween, or bridges to cross rivers. When you need stitches for the costume, or struts for the bridge, you wouldn’t think about molecules.

Just add messaging

When your application just needs messaging, you don’t want to spend countless hours building the materials, wondering if you need the left handed molecule or the right handed molecule. Wouldn’t it be better if you could actually start from the materials?
That is what we have done with this set of initial sample applications. We’ve selected just the right messaging molecules to build materials that you can use to help you build truly awesome apps, your software equivalent of the fourth Firth of Forth bridge.

Messaging patterns

In this initial batch, we have started from the ground up by providing the basic put / get, publish / subscribe materials or styles from which more complex patterns can be built. Our first complex pattern is request / response, which if you look carefully is built from a bi-directional synchronised put / get pattern. Although basic, these samples show you how to incorporate security, TLS, and how to wrap meaningful data into the messages.

Polyglot by design

We covered the languages that we think are most in demand, JMS, .NET C# based XMS, Node.js, Python, and Go. The samples work cross language, so you can mix it up like Comic-Con and have a Go responder to an XMS requester.

Kick off an MQ server to play with

It is all about messaging, so you will need an MQ server. If you don’t already have one then head off to Ready, Set, Connect to find out how to set up an MQ server for development. Then check out our new GitHub repo to find the samples to base your messaging applications on.




Let us know how you get on

This is a work in progress project and we’re sharing it early, so do join the conversation by commenting on this post. You can open issues in GitHub if you encounter problems when you try to use the samples. We do also keep an eye on questions that pop up in Stack Overflow if you tag them with ibm-mq.

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