Accelerate the value of multicloud with collaborative DevSecOps Learn more

Introduction to the Schema.org information model

With the rise of artificial intelligence (AI) and cognitive computing, there's an increasing need for a structured data format that other computers can easily understand. To meet that need, in 2011 a group of search engine companies and large-scale web publishers created an initiative called Schema.org to describe objects that web pages are actually about. In this four-part series, I introduce you to Schema.org and show you how to use it to create more searchable web pages.

  • Article
    Introduction to the Schema.org information model

    This series, in which I explain the Schema.org core information model, helps you expand your web developer skills and get a head start on advances in search engine platforms and personal assistants like Siri, Google Assistant, and Alexa.

  • Article
    The Schema.org syntaxes

    The second part of this four-part series shows you how to translate the abstract information model for data in your web pages into one of the three formats supported by Schema.org: RDFa, Microdata, and JSON-LD.

  • Article
    Understand and use the Schema.org vocabularies

    When you use Schema.org vocabularies and metadata to describe your content, it makes the content more useful and findable to search engines. In Part 3 of this series, I introduce you to the vocabularies used in Schema.org and give you the tools to use them yourself.

  • Article
    Structured data tools

    Using Schema.org to describe the content on your webpages enables search engines and machines to more easily find and index your pages. There are a number of tools that you can use to implement structured data on your pages. In the final part of this series, we'll look at examples…